Households could receive £1,000 in ‘royalty’ payments if they agree to fracture sites built nearby

Households could receive £1,000 in ‘royalty’ payments if they agree to have nearby fracking sites built in a sweeping plan to overcome opposition to drilling

  • Businesses would go door to door trying to convince residents of the benefits
  • If more than half of the families give their approval, it will be considered “local consent”
  • Those who live nearby could receive cash incentives between £500 and £1,000
  • If shale gas is discovered, the owners of the land could be offered a share of the profits

Households could receive up to £1,000 if they agree to have nearby fracking sites built.

As part of a sweeping plan to overcome opposition to drilling, companies would go door to door trying to convince residents of the benefits.

If more than half of the families near a proposed development give their approval, it will be deemed to have received “local consent” and will be expedited through the planning process.

Households could receive up to £1,000 if they agree to have nearby fracking sites built

Those who live nearby, including those who oppose the plan, could receive industry-funded cash incentives of between £500 and £1,000. And if shale gas is discovered, those who own the land above the fracking sites could also be offered a share of the profits.

The “royalty” payments would either be paid in cash or as a reduction in energy bills. Business Secretary Jacob Rees-Mogg is set to outline his plans for Britain’s fracking push next month after Prime Minister Liz Truss lifted the three-year ban.

As part of a sweeping plan to overcome opposition to drilling, companies would go door to door trying to convince residents of the benefits

As part of a sweeping plan to overcome opposition to drilling, companies would go door to door trying to convince residents of the benefits

At an event on the sidelines of the Conservative Party conference, Mr Rees-Mogg suggested that energy firms could ‘shop around, knock door to door… and ask people if they would agree’. He added: “Then they have to go to an identifiable community and if they get 50% plus one in favor they should be able to continue.”

Whitehall sources said a payment system could “unlock” the development by compensating residents for disturbances.

A source told The Times: ‘If you can tell them they’re going to be compensated for this disruption and then get regular payment when these wells are productive, that can change people’s perception of whether or not they’ll support the project.”

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