Meet the London fashion designer, 24, whose beautiful dresses look straight out of Bridgerton

Part of the joy of watching period dramas is marveling at the stunning dresses worn by the ladies, with their flowing skirts, frills, flounces and floral details of a kind you don’t get all just not these days.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, dresses were intricately crafted, multi-layered, scrupulously detailed, and designed to be treasured. Walk into most high street stores in 2022 and you’ll be lucky to find clothes that will last more than a few washes, let alone survive to be passed down from generation to generation, and you’ll be hard pressed to find the kind of ultra-feminine clothes. dresses worn by Daphne from Bridgerton or Lydia from Pride and Prejudice anywhere on the high street.

However, new fashion designer Amy Jane London sets out to fill this gap in the market. Her fashion line is full of gorgeous girly dresses worthy of Marie Antoinette herself, featuring lace, ruffles, corsets and florals designed to “make women feel truly beautiful.”

“I was really interested in creating beautiful, feminine pieces that women can really love and cherish,” Amy, 24, explained. “There aren’t a lot of affordable, feminine, bohemian fashion brands in the UK, and I’ve always liked things really, really pretty, so I wanted to create this in my own style.”

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Inspiration for Amy’s designs came from a “love affair between vintage flowers and the silhouette of the prairie dress”, her favorite period films like Anna Karenina and the vintage stalls of Portobello Road.

Amy launched her fashion label three months before graduating from the University of Westminster in 2021, but has been designing clothes since she was 14. Amy suffers from dyslexia, so growing up she fell in love with drawing and art as a way to express herself, and that artistic flair turned into a love for fashion.

During her studies, she worked for a few luxury designers and interned at Preen By Thornton Bregazzi, a fashion brand known for its romantic floral prints mixed with a punk aura that was worn by Amy Winehouse and Kate Middleton.

“I learned so much and it really helped me on the path I’m on now,” Amy said of the internship. “It was all very Victorian inspired, and the way they design was really interesting, so some elements of my fashion line came from that experience.”

Inspiration for her own fashion line came from a “love affair between vintage flowers and the silhouette of the prairie dress”, as well as watching her favorite period films like Anna Karenina and Fridays Gone browse the vintage stalls of Portobello Road. “I’m obsessed with vintage and source a lot myself,” Amy said. “It’s so amazing when a piece has a story, when it’s a unique piece, and that authenticity is what I want to put into my own designs.”



Amy wanted her fashion line to be
Amy wanted her fashion line to be “a modern take on Marie Antoinette’s wardrobe”, creating “a whole world of ultra-feminine and truly beautiful pieces”.

While Amy Jane London’s dresses are true pieces of flamboyant femininity, they are designed to be treasured, cared for and kept for years to be worn on memorable occasions, just like the vintage pieces Amy wore herself on. is inspired. The dresses are all handmade in a small factory in India by talented seamstresses using high quality fabrics, giving them the best chance of a long life.

“We really encourage our customers to cherish our pieces,” she said. “They are seasonless, you can wear them in winter with boots and coats, they can be styled in different ways.”

Amy wanted her fashion line to be “a modern take on Marie Antoinette’s wardrobe”, creating “a whole world of ultra-feminine and truly beautiful pieces”, and plans to move from dresses to sportswear, to swimwear and children’s clothing. She said she takes a look at vintage pieces, whether it’s historic fashion or “romantic, over-the-top ’80s wedding dresses” and transforms them into a modern piece that retains the quintessential feminine charm of fashion. ‘original.



Amy Jane London's romantic Sofia dress went viral on TikTok
Amy Jane London’s romantic Sofia dress went viral on TikTok

21st-century girls have been proven to love 18th-century style: One of Amy’s most recent designs – the romantic bodice and ruffled skirt Sofia dress – has gone viral on TikTok, so she’s coming to launch an even more feminine version in ballerina pink.

“The Sofia dress is my favorite piece that’s come out so far,” she said. “It’s all my ideas woven into one – it’s got the Victorian feel, the fabric is really nice, the cut and fit is really nice, and it’s so feminine. It’s the most exciting piece for me so far that I’ve designed, and of course the response has been amazing. But there’s plenty more in the works!”



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Amy Jane London has a brand new collection coming out in the spring and the previous collection, ‘The Intimate Romance’, will go on sale with the discount code BEMINE to keep impatient shoppers well dressed while they wait for the new season to launch.

Amy still has a lot to do for future collections, from matching mother-child outfits to romantic swimwear and activewear, bringing feminine charm to every aspect of a modern woman’s life. Keep up to date with everything the talented young designer is up to by following @amyjanelondon on Instagram or visiting amyjanelondon.co.uk.

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